Netflix’s ‘Trese’ Spotlights Filipino Folklore Through Binge-able Storytelling

The highly anticipated anime adaptation of Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo’s comic book series, Trese, is at last available to stream on Netflix. The adventures of hardcore investigator Alexandra Trese spring from the black-and-white comic illustrations into this beautifully animated, heavily detailed world, filled with tons of action, Filipino folklore, and a destiny cemented by circumstances but defined by respectable character.

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NOC Review: Kneel Before ‘Loki,’ the Best Marvel Studios Series Thus Far!

I realize I’ve only seen two episodes, but as of this moment, Loki is absolutely already my favorite of the Marvel Studios shows so far. Don’t get me wrong. WandaVision is incredibly original and ambitious. The Falcon and the Winter Soldier Captain America and the Winter Soldier was relevant and politically aware. But after the first two episodes of each, I found myself questioning whether or not I loved the shows as much as the films. Yes it’s great to give us time to explore these characters as more than just B-members of The Avengers, playing second fiddle to the original six. But was it really going to give me the same feelings I got whenever I’d walk out of the cinemas after another rousing $200M budgeted 2-3 hour installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe?

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A Review of ‘Across the Tracks’

Greenwood, Oklahoma aka “Black Wall Street,” dubbed so by Booker T. Washington, was a once thriving Black community. Thoroughly segregated from the rest of white Tulsa, nevertheless it boasted entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, entertainment venues, and markets, everything a town would need to sustain itself. To be happy and self-sufficient. That is until 1921 when a mob of deputized whites burned the town to the ground. Not only were the murderous white mob deputized to engage in the massacre, they were given weapons by officials of the city government. The even used an aerial bomb.

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Flight School Studio’s ‘Stonefly’ is a Must-Play Indie Game

This week, the folks at Flight School Studios and MWM Interactive released their indie mech title, Stonefly. The adventure game is a chill yet wholly beautifully exploration of legacy, resource gathering and mech building, as players follow Annika Stonefly in her search for her father’s stolen rig. After a late-night excursion, Annika mistakenly leaves the garage door storing the mech wide open, leaving it victim to a theft that launches our main character on her journey through dangerous and captivating flora and fauna.

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NOC Review: ‘The Conjuring 3’ is a Solid ‘X-Files’ Episode

No, not literally (although, that would be pretty freakin’ amazing if there was a crossover). I realized I am aging myself quite considerably with the comparison (so if it makes you feel better, comparing it to a Supernatural episode would be no less apt). However, I bring it up because, in a lot of ways, The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It actually reminded me more of an episode of The X-Files than a Conjuring movie. And, also in a lot of ways, that is a mostly good thing.

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Scholastic’s ‘Miles Morales: Shock Waves’ is Exactly What My Inner Teen Needed

*SPOILERS AHEAD!*

My earliest memories of my elementary and middle school Scholastic Book Fairs saw massive collections of R. L. Stine’s Goosebumps, loads of nonsensical ’90s tech, and the burgeoning mystery genre before it really took off in young adult literature. Super hero graphic novels were almost nonexistent for kids and teenagers in school spaces in the late ’90s and early 2000s, so it goes without saying that best-selling author Justin A. Reynolds (Opposite of Always) and Eisner-nominated artist Pablo Leon’s Miles Morales: Shock Waves is a gift to the teen in me.

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‘Reptil #1’ Review: Meet The Family

It’s finally here! Reptil #1 finally hit comic book shelves last Tuesday, reintroducing fans to a longtime member of Marvel’s heroes gallery. Humberto Lopez, a.k.a Reptil, finally gets his own solo series, taking us deeper into the life of the teenage dino-shifting hero. But the emphasis isn’t on Beto’s life as a superhero. Amidst the disbanding of the Avengers Academy team and the world-changing effects of Kamala’s Law, writer Terry Blas takes on a personal journey for Beto — introducing us to several members of his family and delivering a comic proud to represent the Latinx community in a fresh, inspiring way.

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‘Made In Korea’ Review: Parents By Proxy

Every so often there comes a comic that manages to pique my interest almost instantly. A book that catches my eye before I’m even finished with the first panel, let alone the first page.

That’s the case with Made in Korea, a new six-issue limited series written by Jeremy Holt and George Shall.

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‘La Mano del Destino’ Creates a Vivid, Action-packed Luchaverse

¡Mira! El Luchador is coming — and not just any luchador — La Mano del Destino, the champion with a mission, the fighter bent on reclaiming his rightful place in the ring, the man with the weight of revolutionary history upon him.

In La Mano del Destino, a new release from Top Cow and Image Comics, J. Gonzo creates a vivid, action-packed Luchaverse for us — an alternate 1960s Mexico that takes us into the Mexican sport lucha libre (literally “free wrestling”) and the home and memories of our hero, La Mano del Destino.

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‘In the Heights’ Captures the Beauty of Washington Heights and the Community Behind It

It seems like only yesterday when national treasure and lyricist genius Lin-Manuel Miranda graced the Richard Rodgers Theatre as Usnavi in the Broadway production of In the Heights. Now, 13 years later, the Tony Award-winning musical is finally premiering on the big screen next month. 

Directed by Jon M. Chu, with a screenplay written by the original writer of the musical’s book Quiara Alegría Hudes, In the Heights tells the story of Usnavi (Anthony Ramos), a charismatic bodega owner in Washington Heights who saves every penny from his daily grind as he has a sueñito — aka little dream — of getting out of the barrio and living in the Dominican Republic, where his family was from. Right off the bat in the film, we get a glimpse of life in the small Latinx community, especially the people that Usnavi interacts with on the daily — his cousin Sonny (Gregory Diaz IV); “Abuela” Claudia (Olga Merediz); the ladies of the beauty shop — Daniela (Daphne Rubin-Vega), Carla (Stephanie Beatriz), and Cuca (Dascha Polanco); taxi company owner Kevin Rosario (Jimmy Smits) whose daughter Nina (Leslie Grace) is studying at Stanford; Usnavi’s best friend Benny (Corey Hawkins); Usnavi’s crush Vanessa (Melissa Barrera), an aspiring fashion designer who wants to move to Manhattan; and, Piraguero the Piragua Guy (Lin-Manuel Miranda). Although it is a huge cast, each of them gets their own time to shine, especially Miranda’s Piragua Guy, which is always a delight to see Miranda do anything. 

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NOC Review: A Worthy Return to ‘A Quiet Place’

As I came up with the title for this review, I got emotional. It’s been a long, difficult time for me not being able to enjoy a film in a darkened theater. You see, film is my second passion (behind superhero comic books of course), and while going to the cinema is an absolutely necessary sacrifice in the name of public health and safety, I can’t deny I’ve missed it. And A Quiet Place Part II represents the first film I’ve seen in a theater since March of 2020.

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‘Time Before Time’ Review: Leave Your Troubles Behind

What would you do if you could leave all your troubles in the past, literally? If starting over again was as easy as hopping in a rickety metal box, pressing a few buttons, and starting life anew in a completely different century? That’s the question posed in Time Before Time, a brand new series written by Declan Shalvey and Rory McConville with art by Joe Palmer.

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HBO Max is Hosting a ‘Mortal Kombat’ Watch Party with the Kast Tonight

Heyyy NOC Readers! It’s Kuya P and I just got word from my friends over at HBO Max that they have gathered some of the amazing cast to do a watch party for Mortal Kombat currently in Theaters and streaming now on HBO Max!

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NOC Review: With ‘Star Wars: The Bad Batch,’ Filoni Triumphs Again

May the Fourth be with you!

Today, we commemorate a franchise that is loved unconditionally. From the biggest disasters (Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones, Rise of Skywalker) to the biggest wins (Empire Strikes Back, Rogue One, The Mandalorian), Star Wars has been the one franchise whose highest highs make it simply impossible for us to quit. The Original Trilogy is, and always will be, regarded as one of the greatest film sagas of all time. The prequel trilogy and the sequel trilogy, however…?

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‘Yasuke’ is a Beautiful and Bloody Love Letter to the First Black Samurai

Yasuke. A real life folktale. Not so much in the sense that he never existed. It’s more like there isn’t much known about his mysterious life, aside from how challenging it must have been.

All that’s known about history’s first Black samurai is that he was likely born around 1540 in Africa, around the Mozambique area. At some point in his life he came in contact with Oda Nobunaga, a feudal lord of Japan, and became a member of his samurai guard.

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A “Short” Conversation with ’22 Vs. Earth’ Director Kevin Nolting and a Mini-Review

They may have won the Oscar this year, but Pixar has not lost its “Soul.” That’s right! As we reported recently, this Friday, Pixar is debuting its latest short, 22 Vs. Earth on Disney+. The film is a prequel to last year’s Oscar winner for Best Animated Film, and recipient of the highly coveted “Mike Manalo’s Favorite Movie of the Year Award,” Soul. It reunites us with the hilarious Tina Fey as 22, as well as the unborn souls and the Jerrys, prior to 22 meeting Joe Gardner. And to commemorate the return to The Great Before, The Nerds of Color was given the opportunity to participate in a short press event with other members of the press, to speak to the short film’s director, Kevin Nolting.

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NOC Review: ‘Mortal Kombat’ is Not a Flawless Victory

It’s ironic that this would be a review I’m covering following Godzilla Vs. Kong because it actually has the opposite problem. It’s great from a POC standpoint. But it’s just not a very good movie, I’m afraid. Yes, it’s my unfortunate responsibility to tell you that Mortal Kombat is a dud. It’s a bland entry to the list of barely passable video game adaptations that would ultimately leave Shang Tsung starving, because it has no real soul to suck from it anyway. While not completely atrocious, it is about as forgettable and lifeless as, say, 2018’s Tomb Raider reboot.

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