10 Ways to Really Support Diversity in Comics

We have reached a crucial crossroads when it comes to diversity in comics, and I fear that if things don’t change, we will lose ground. It is not enough to demand diversity in comics, we must support what’s out there now, or there won’t be more in the future. Money talks, and those that want diversity in comics must learn to use the system currently in place, while also creating a new system of sales and promotion.

To that end, here are ten lessons in Comics & Diversity, via twitter.

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Joe Glass and The Pride: LGBTQ Superheroes for a New Generation

Writer Joe Glass is out to change the world with his super powered comic book team The Pride, a team of super-heroes fighting against adversity for LGBTQ everywhere. I had the pleasure of speaking with Joe about The Pride project, his inspirations, and his upcoming adventures!

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Web Portal Opens Door for Black Creators

Here at The Nerds of Color, we’re always on the look out for spaces that not only shine a light on the lack of diversity in comics, but actually are doing something about it.

We recently learned about a new web portal that just launched a few days ago. It’s called Peep Game Comix, and its mission is to showcase the work of African American comic authors, artists, and publishers.

Check out their official press release after the jump.

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Where the New Black Comics Writers Are

The other day, one of our favorite websites, Bleeding Cool, posted a column by Devon Sanders bemoaning the lack of black writers in comics — or more precisely at the Big Two (i.e., DC and Marvel) as well as the mid-major publishers like Dark Horse and Boom. Since its publication, the article has been making its way around the comics blogosphere and message boards sparking some much-needed conversation about the lack of diversity in comics.

The question posed is focused primarily on the lack of black comics writers, and not artists such as Shawn Martinbrough, Jamal Igle, Kyle Baker, or Rob Guillory whose mainstream comics work have all developed quite a following. In the article, Sanders says:

This is the writer’s name, the one you see above everyone else’s and when you count black writers actively working for Marvel, DC, Image, Dark Horse, etc. it comes down to less than the number of digits on Nightcrawler’s hand.

Now while the thesis of the article is the lack of black writers at the big publishers, the column’s title posited the question “Where are the New Black Comics Writers?” The answer to that particular question would be to look beyond the Big Two. Just ask our own Brandon Easton who recently received an Eisner nom for his work on the spectacular Watson and Holmes.

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Maybe DC Can Reprint John Ridley’s American Way

(UPDATED March 2, 2014: Ridley actually won the Oscar, so what are you waiting for, DC?)

This morning, acclaimed screenwriter John Ridley scored his first Academy Award nomination for his adapted screenplay of 12 Years a Slave. If Ridley wins, will he be the first comic book writer with an Oscar?

That’s right. If you didn’t know, while John Ridley is known primarily for his work on the big screen (in addition to 12 Years, Ridley’s filmography includes writing credits on Undercover BrotherThree Kings, and Red Tails), he also has an extensive resume in nerdy television (Justice League, Static Shock) and comics (The Authority, The American Way). Unfortunately, collected editions of his work on either book is out of print.

That said, individual issues of The American Way are still available digitally on ComiXology. But I’m old school and still prefer holding a book in my hand instead of an iPad.

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The Army of Dr. Moreau is Available Digitally

Last week, David Walker threw down the gauntlet for folks who say there isn’t enough diversity in comics but may not buy — or even know about — comics and graphic novels by writers and artists of color. If you feel like supporting creators of color and publishers who aren’t “the big two,” you can start with a digital-only book by Walker himself. The third issue of David Walker’s digital mini-series The Army of Dr. Moreau comes out today exclusively on ComiXology.

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The Lack of Diversity in Comics: What’re You Doing About It?

ImageIt seems like every day I read something, somewhere, about the lack of diversity in comics (not to mention various other pop culture mediums). Sometimes these pieces focus on gender, other times on people of color, and sometimes both. At the recent Image Expo, sixteen comic creators took the stage, with only two being women, and none being of color, and in the aftermath we are once again having this conversation. (Read about it here on Bleeding Cool.) To be absolutely clear, this lack of representation in the creative forces that produce comics is problematic. There needs to be greater diversity on many levels when it comes to comics, both on the creative side, and within the stories that are being produced. But that is only one problem, and not the problem I want to address.

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