‘When I’m A Moth’ is Beautiful but Doesn’t Say Anything

Waking from a dream never felt so unfinished as it did when I reached the end credits of When I’m A Moth, an independent film directed by Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak, written by Cotler. It’s a film that on paper has all the markings of being an arthouse darling — a small cast, eerie poetic dream visuals, pontifications on choice and fate with a going nowhere protagonist and yet, as I rose from my seat afterwards, it felt as if I was remembering a half dream. Unable to finish the thought of what it wanted to be but fascinated by the parts I could remember.

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NOC Sundance Review: ‘Judas and the Black Messiah’

While the details of Judas Iscariot’s betrayal of Jesus Christ are debated, Judas goes down in history as one of the most infamous traitors — all over 30 pieces of silver. Maybe Judas didn’t like the fact that the people hailed Christ as a “Messiah” — a title the FBI used as code names for Black radical liberators in the 1960s to the late 1970s. One such “Messiah” is the young Black Panther activist and Chicago native Fred Hampton, mercilessly killed thanks to Black a panther Party (BPP) infiltrator and informant William O’Neal, FBI Agent Roy Mitchell, and J. Edgar Hoover.

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UPDATED NOC Theories: The “Whos,” “Whats,” and “Whys” of ‘WandaVision’

By Laura Sirikul and Mike Manalo

By now, if you’re anything like us, you’ve already seen the first three episodes of WandaVision. If not — how dare you call yourself an MCU fan (just kidding, we love you!). Having said that, it’s no spoiler to say the show presents an intriguing slow burn mystery that keeps us guessing from the first frame to the very last frame of the third episode. And boy do we love the hell out of it! But, do we have any idea what’s going on, and why, or how it all leads into Marvel Studios’ first horror film, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness? Not a clue. And I’m sure you all are saying the same things. So being that we’re all MCU fans here at The Nerds of Color, we want to commiserate with you, our faithful fandom family, and see if we can put together our detective hats and paranoid “Charlie Day” conspiracy theory boards to present a few potential theories about where the series is going, and what the underlying story is behind WandaVision. If we’re wrong, please don’t hate us, but if we’re right, Marvel Studios owes us $2 billion dollars for cracking the case (Update: We’ve reached out to them and they said no to this so… just bragging rights)!

**Please note, we absolutely cannot express strongly enough that we will dive into spoiler territory for the first three episodes. So if you have not seen them yet, we very much encourage you to please watch before you read the rest of this article.**

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Brad Bird on the Parr Timeline and Adding Personal Touches in ‘Incredibles 2’

It’s has been 14 years since we’ve seen the Parr family come together and fight villains. For Brad Bird, he didn’t really notice the years gone by between the first film and the upcoming release of The Incredibles 2.

“I think there is a tendency nowadays to not get the soda pop,” Bird explained in an earlier press junket where the NOC attended in March. “You just want direct syrup. You just want ‘Syrup now!’ I don’t know. I think that, for me, it was not intentional. I just don’t think it wasn’t the greatest idea creatively to follow up with a successful film with its sequel. You want to take time. You want to think about it. You want to enjoy the process.”

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What’s Hiding Behind the Feel-Good Curtain of Hidden Figures: One Black Feminist’s Take

In a scene in Hidden Figures that is all too familiar for Black women viewers, or really anyone from a historically marginalized group, Taraji P. Henson’s character Katherine Johnson rushes to enter the NASA control room where she has just handed off crucial calculations for astronaut John Glenn’s safe return from orbit, and has the door summarily slammed in her face. The camera lingers on Henson’s profile, as she grapples yet again with the devastating knowledge that although she may be a useful “computer” for spitting out numbers that may make missions successful and even save lives, she is still not seen as fully human in the eyes of her peers and superiors. Indeed, in Henson’s capable hands, viewers ourselves experience the physical and emotional pain of being barred from entering the halls of power for absurd reasons beyond one’s control — in this case, race and gender.

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What Star Trek Meant for My Grandfather

Star Trek has meant a lot to me as a fan of pop culture, science-fiction, and television. It also has meant everything to me as a human being.

My grandfather, who was a WWII veteran, likely served in a segregated unit in the war. He returned home to a nation still refusing to deal with Jim Crow and other societal injustice.

When I was a very young, I recall him watching various genre programs like Wild Wild West, Gunsmoke, Rat Patrol, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., and countless other series. However, he especially loved Star Trek.

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