Image Comics Goes Way Down to Hadestown with ‘Punderworld’ Graphic Novel

One of my favorite parts of the Tony-Award winning Broadway musical Hadestown is the story of Patrick Page’s Hades and Amber Gray’s Persephone. Also, I’m always down for interesting reinterpretations of Greek myths. Now, one of the biggest webcomics on the internet, Punderworld, is coming to comic shops from fan-favorite creator Linda Šejić. Think of it as a kind of prequel to Hadestown.

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Going Medieval

I’m always amazed at how many people are so quick to argue that people of color did not exist in Europe during medieval times or that black people, for instance, weren’t around during the Greek and Roman eras. And to include said PoCs during such time periods would be unrealistic and another example of shoving a PC agenda down our throats OH-EM-GEE.

This usually comes up in medieval fantasy stories. Like say for instance, Guinevere in BBC’s Merlin. Actress Angel Coulby caught heat for daring to be a beautiful powerful black queen.

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The Pristine Balance: The Role of Wonder Woman in the DC Trinity

In honor of Women’s History Month…

Musician Janelle Monae has an empowering motto that she shares with other women: “Come in peace, but mean business.”

There couldn’t possibly be a better motto that sums up Wonder Woman, more specifically her role in the DC Trinity. Too often Wonder Woman is conflated for Super Woman, i.e., a female version of Superman and that couldn’t be further from the truth.

The Themysciran Princess has her own agency and a most vital purpose. She’s the pristine balance.

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How to Not Screw Up a Wonder Woman Film

Okay folks. No more lists. I (semi-) promise. I’m writing this post because I’m getting rather sick of the “no women or people of color as leads in superhero films” stance Hollywood has taken. The scuttlebutt is that these films are not viable and won’t make money overseas. Of course they aren’t viable — if you make crap films. See Halle Berry’s Catwoman for what not to do. They had to have known it was going to be crap, so why did they make it? Was the option running out?

Wonder Woman is especially near and dear to me as she is the first superhero my daughter really got into (then came Storm, and on to her current favorite, Vixen) and ignited her love for all things super-heroic. I was a fan of the 1970s Lynda Carter television show, but it does not hold up — not in any way. A contemporary version is needed. A contemporary film is needed. Diana is too big for the small screen. All of the young girls who love this stuff, but are routinely left out in the cinema, will thank you when this film is done correctly. Hell, even Kevin Tsujihara — the CEO of Warner Bros. (y’know, the company that owns the property) knows what time it is. 

Well, let’s get to it.

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