A Review of ‘Across the Tracks’

Greenwood, Oklahoma aka “Black Wall Street,” dubbed so by Booker T. Washington, was a once thriving Black community. Thoroughly segregated from the rest of white Tulsa, nevertheless it boasted entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, entertainment venues, and markets, everything a town would need to sustain itself. To be happy and self-sufficient. That is until 1921 when a mob of deputized whites burned the town to the ground. Not only were the murderous white mob deputized to engage in the massacre, they were given weapons by officials of the city government. The even used an aerial bomb.

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Southern Fried Asian: Dr. David Surratt

On a new episode of Southern Fried Asian, Keith is joined by Vice President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students at the University of Oklahoma Dr. David Surratt to talk about growing up Black and Korean in Tulsa.

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DC FanDome: How ‘Watchmen’ Explores the Issues of Corrupt Power and Systemic Racism

“When the police masked [in the events of the show], it raised the question of accountability, because at some point, [it becomes a question of] who’s the good guy/who’s the bad guy” — Christal Henry, Supervising Producer of Watchmen (2019)

This quote, which kicked off the most fascinating panel/segment in the DC FanDome for Watchmen: Unmasked, embodies more than just what was going on in the narrative of the show. It’s a quote that fully embodies what we’re seeing in our society today. When you replace the metaphor of a mask with a badge, we understand that Watchmen is, as the graphic novel was too, an absolute reflection of the sins of society told through the lenses of both the empowered and the powerless. And therein is why Watchmen is perhaps one of the best television events in the past decade.

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Get Ready for the DC FanDome!

It’s been a long, long quarantine folks. Let’s be honest, under normal circumstances, we’d all be waist deep in Con season — the most wonderful time of the year; starting with Wondercon, then Paleyfest, E3, Anime Expo, and glorious, glorious SDCC. But alas, 2020 has been something of a cruel master. And while truthfully these are a.) first-world problems, and b.) necessary sacrifices to maintain health and safety, yours truly still longs for the ability to take solace and comfort in the simple joys of abandoning life’s problems, and uniting as one ginormous tribe of nerds, hugging and crying over the excitement generated from the world debut of the most anticipated trailers of the year in Hall H. I miss those days, and if you’re anything like me, I’m sure you all do too.

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Disappointment For Người Tôi In HBO’s ‘Watchmen’

by Adam Chau

Since the finale of HBO’s Watchmen, I’ve been trying to reconcile my initial and absolute love for the show along with the eventual (and building) disappointment that I felt by the final episode for the Vietnamese characters and lịch sử brought into the show — but also keeping in mind that at its heart it’s a story about a Black Female Protagonist, the impetus for PTSD the Tulsa Race Riots, aka Massacre (which people still don’t know about), and the trauma and rising of a Black American lineage — không gia đình Việt Nam.

In that way it’s not a straight line from one thought to one conclusion — it’s the questions and the feelings they’ve brought up, their validity in a fictional world clearly designed to take on racism by POC, where there is inclusivity, but where I also can’t help but feel some of the underlying tones are still a recycle of already recycled stories, fictional and beleaguered, where Vietnamese and Asian Americans are still not fully embraced.

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‘Lost’ Legacies: How to Re-imagine Sacred Nerd Texts

Before December 2019 ends, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on one of the most significant pop culture artifacts of the year. This is the month, after all, in which one of the co-creators of the iconic series Lost gave us a critically acclaimed and universally praised ninth episode of a series that breathed new life into a franchise that had not been this beloved since the mid-1980s. By shifting the focus away from the historically white male heroes of the original and toward a story centering women and people of color, the creators had to also confront the toxic — and often racist — fan culture that had laid claim to the property for over thirty years. Plus, they were able to do all of this without the consent of the property’s original creator.

Of course, I’m talking about Watchmen on HBO.

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Hard NOC Life: Jamie Noguchi’s ‘Dark Fate’

On a special Hard NOC Media crossover, Jamie Noguchi of the Fuckin’ Do It Cast joins Keith on Hard NOC Life to figure out why Terminator: Dark Fate failed at the box office.

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AOC is NOC AF! (Updated)

UPDATED OCTOBER 13, 2019 for Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s birthday. See #12-14 below!

For those visiting our blog for the first time, ‘round these parts “N.O.C.” stands for Nerds Of Color (or Non-Official-Cover if you’ve just rewatched the first Mission: Impossible film).

It’s a term of inclusivity that we wear with pride. And because part of our nerdy duties include ingesting a lot of TV, movies, and Twitter, we feel obligated to note that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is, by her choice of pop-culture references on Twitter and other forums, also a Nerd Of Color. (We’ll update this listicle periodically as Rep. AOC continues to use Twitter to do spectacularly nerdy things.)

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Rebirth’s Big Bad Could be the Best Thing to Happen to DC in Years

by EC Yi

After a friend told me the big reveal from today’s premiere release of Rebirth this morning, I went the closest comic shop during my lunch break and gave DC money to read the issue firsthand. This friend was bent out of shape over today’s news that the force orchestrating the recent changes in DCU was none other than…

(Seriously, if you haven’t found out already, I’m about to spoil the Big Bad reveal here. Last chance.)

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This Frozen/Watchmen Mashup Wins the Internet

As you know, we love the movie Frozen here at The Nerds of Color. Now that it has been released on blu-ray and DVD, fans can rewatch Elsa’s triumphant “Let it Go” sequence over and over again. Though if they had an internet connection, chances are they’ve been doing that already since it’s been on YouTube since December.

As great as the song — as performed by the Wicked-ly talented, one and only Adele Dazeem Idina Menzel — is, you haven’t experienced it until you see it set to the exploits of a naked blue superhuman:

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Boom! Pow! Smash! Adam WarRock Raps About Batman

This morning, Newsarama debuted the video for “B.S.F.X.,” the lead single off Adam WarRock‘s forthcoming studio album The Middle of Nowhere.

Since WarRock is such an avowed Marvel head (as if his rap name didn’t already give it away), songs in the key of DC are few and far between. But from the Watchmenesque album cover to his latest single, it seems Adam isn’t just exclusive to “the 616.” So when he drops a track about the Dark Knight, you know I’m about it!

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